Rachael Lorna Johnstone publishes two new articles

Colonialism, Indigenous Peoples and Natural resources
Rachael Lorna Johnstone publishes two new articles

Rachael Lorna Johnstone, professor of law at UNAK, published two new articles in December 2020. The first is “From the Indian Ocean to the Arctic: What the Chagos Archipelago Advisory Opinion Tells Us about Greenland.” It examines the 2019 Chagos Archipelago Advisory Opinion from the International Court of Justice and compares this to the legal history of Greenland. She shows that in both cases, the indigenous populations were not properly consulted in the decolonisation process and that they remain excluded from international legal processes that determine their futures. It is published in the 12th Yearbook of Polar Law, a publication of UNAK and Brill, which is based primarily on contributions from the annual Polar Law Symposia. This volume of the Yearbook was guest-edited by Julia Jabour of the University of Tasmania and guest lecturer at the University of Akureyri. 

Rachael's second piece is a book chapter with New Zealand scholar, Scott Joblin, “Non-living resources and the Poles,” which examines the governance of non-living natural resources in the Polar Regions. It is in the new Research Handbook of Polar Law, edited by Karen Scott and David VanderZwaag, published by Edward Elgar. Rachael and Scott examine the different international legal regimes that govern extractive industries, with emphasis on the stability of the Madrid Protocol moratorium on extractive industries in the Antarctic and the rights of Indigenous Peoples in the Arctic. 

Rachael directs the master's programmes in Polar Law at the University of Akureyri